The Clinical Study about Qualitative and Quantitative Characteristics of Acupuncture Sensation According to the Body Parts

Article information

J Korean Acupunct Moxib Soc. 2013;30(5):65-76
Publication date (electronic) : 2013 December 20
doi : https://doi.org/10.13045/acupunct.2013046
1School of Oriental Medicine, College of Oriental Medicine, Dongguk University
2Department of Acupuncture & Moxibustion, Dongguk University, Bundang Oriental Hospital
3Department of Acupuncture & Moxibustion, Dongguk University, Ilsan Oriental Hospital

This study was supported by a grant of the Traditional Korean Medicine R&D Project, Ministry for Health &Welfare, Republic of Korea(B110069)

*Corresponding author : Department of Acupuncture & Moxibustion Medicine, Dongguk University Bundang Oriental Hospital, 87-2 Sunae 3-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, Korea, Tel. +82-31-710-3751 E-mail : hanijjung@naver.com
Received 2013 November 11; Revised 2013 December 06; Accepted 2013 December 09.

Abstract

Objectives:

This study was designed to find out the differences of the acupuncture sensation by body parts.

Methods:

Sixty-three subjects got acupuncture at five acupoints which represent five different body parts ; head(GV20), abdomen(ST25), back(BL24), upper extremity(LU9), lower extremity(GB40). All subjests were asked to complete questionnaire rating the intensity of 13 kinds of acupuncture sensation(acupuncture sensation scale, ASS). We compared the subjective acupuncture sensation between the body parts.

Results:

Intensity of acupuncture sensation of GV20 was significantly lower than LU9(p=0.001) and GB40(p=0.000). Sum of acupuncture sensation of GV20 was also significantly lower than BL24(p=0.011), LU9(p=0.004) and GB40(p=0.033). Among the 13 types of acupuncture sensation scale, tingling and aching were well sensed at GV20 and ST25, aching, tingling and sharp pain were well sensed at LU9, GB40, dull pain, deep pressure and heaviness were well sensed at BL24.

Conclusions:

Head showed significantly lower intensity of acupuncture sensation than upper extremity and lower extremity. Among the acupuncture sensation scales, tingling and aching were well sensed at head and abdomen, aching, tingling and sharp pain were well sensed at upper extremity and lower extremity, dull pain, deep pressure and heaviness were well sensed at back.

Fig. 1.

Intensity of acupuncture sensation by acupoints

**: significant at p<0.01.

Fig. 2.

Differences of acupuncture sensation scale by acupoints

1 : GV20. 2 : ST25. 3 : BL24. 4 : LU9. 5 : GB40.

*: significant at p<0.05. ** : significant at p<0.01.

Fig. 3.

Difference of intensity of acupuncture sensation of factors by acupoints

*: significant at p<0.05. ** : significant at p<0.01.

Fig. 4.

Difference of needling depth by acupoints

**: significant at p <0.01

Demographic Data of Participants(n=63)

Acupuncture Sensation by Acupoints

Presence of Acupuncture Sensation by 13 Types of Acupuncture Sensation Scale Items and Acupoints C(E)

Factor Loadings of Acupuncture Sensation Scale Items

Presence of Acupuncture Sensation by Factors C(E)

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Article information Continued

Fig. 1.

Intensity of acupuncture sensation by acupoints

**: significant at p<0.01.

Fig. 2.

Differences of acupuncture sensation scale by acupoints

1 : GV20. 2 : ST25. 3 : BL24. 4 : LU9. 5 : GB40.

*: significant at p<0.05. ** : significant at p<0.01.

Fig. 3.

Difference of intensity of acupuncture sensation of factors by acupoints

*: significant at p<0.05. ** : significant at p<0.01.

Fig. 4.

Difference of needling depth by acupoints

**: significant at p <0.01

Table 1.

Demographic Data of Participants(n=63)

Variable Min Max
Age(yr) 26.06 ± 4.41 22 40
BMI 21.32 ± 2.59 16.97 30.86
Height(cm) 168.92 ± 8.30 155 187
Weight(kg) 61.31 ± 11.56 43 100
Gender Male 38(60.32 %)
Female 25(39.68 %)
Psychological sensitivity Dull 8
Moderate 39
Sensitive 16

Values are mean ± SD or number(percentage).

BMI : body mass index.

Table 2.

Acupuncture Sensation by Acupoints

Acupoint Soreness Aching Deep pressure Heaviness Fullness Tingling Numbness Sharp pain Dull pain Warmth Cold Throbbing Other
GV20 0.08±0.42 0.77±1.55 0.29±1.24 0.29±0.80 0.37±1.33 1.31±2.05 0.23±0.68 0.50±1.45 0.35±0.78 0 0.07±0.37 0.20±0.80 0.00±0.01
ST25 0.37±1.33 0.79±1.79 1.17±1.86 1.01±1.84 0.61±1.32 1.40±2.29 0.15±0.65 0.60±1.70 1.28±1.94 0.20±0.80 0.03±0.20 0.35±1.11 0.00±0.03
BL24 0.37±1.47 0.92±2.08 1.48±1.96 1.37±2.17 0.88±1.66 1.12±2.31 0.03±0.20 0.74±2.03 1.56±2.04 0.04±0.35 0.00±0.00 0.20±0.91 0.03±0.26
LU9 0.54±1.70 1.85±2.57 0.89±1.78 0.47±1.53 0.51±1.50 1.68±2.38 0.13±0.90 1.42±2.46 0.49±1.34 0.18±0.85 0.03±0.18 0.90±1.92 0.01±0.11
GB40 0.52±1.44 1.77±2.51 0.94±1.99 0.56±1.18 0.38±1.32 1.56±2.38 0.06±0.44 1.30±2.31 0.75±1.50 0.04±0.34 0.08±0.41 0.35±1.40 0.00±0.00
Total 0.38±1.35 1.22±2.18 0.95±1.82 0.74±1.62 0.55±1.43 1.41±2.28 0.12±0.62 0.91±2.05 0.89±1.64 0.09±0.57 0.04±0.27 0.40±1.31 0.01±0.13

Table 3.

Presence of Acupuncture Sensation by 13 Types of Acupuncture Sensation Scale Items and Acupoints C(E)

GV20 ST25 BL24 LU9 GB40 Total/expected p-value
Soreness 2(6) 6(6) 5(6) 8(6) 9(6) 30 0.218
Aching 19(21.6) 13(21.6) 15(21.6) 31(21.6) 30(21.6) 108** 0.001
Deep pressure 6(18.6) 24(18.6) 30(18.6) 17(18.6) 16(18.6) 93** 0.000
Heaviness 9(15.2) 19(15.2) 25(15.2) 7(15.2) 16(15.2) 76** 0.001
Fullness 8(10.8) 14(10.8) 18(10.8) 8(10.8) 6(10.8) 54* 0.029
Tingling 30(26.2) 25(26.2) 18(26.2) 31(26.2) 27(26.2) 131 0.133
Numbness 10(4) 4(4) 2(4) 2(4) 2(4) 20* 0.031
Sharp pain 10(14) 9(14) 9(14) 21(14) 21(14) 70** 0.005
Dull pain 15(20.6) 26(20.6) 35(20.6) 10(20.6) 17(20.6) 103** 0.000
Warmth 0(2.2) 5(2.2) 1(2.2) 4(2.2) 1(2.2) 11 0.078
Cold 4(2.2) 2(2.2) 0(2.2) 2(2.2) 3(2.2) 11 0.387
Throbbing 6(7.8) 7(7.8) 5(7.8) 15(7.8) 6(7.8) 39 0.076
Other 1(1) 2(1) 1(1) 1(1) 1(1) 5 0.960
*:

significant at p<0.05.

** :

significant at p<0.01.

C= count. E=expected.

Table 4.

Factor Loadings of Acupuncture Sensation Scale Items

Factor 1 Factor 2 Factor 3 Factor 4
Aching 0.6917
Tingling 0.7513
Sharp pain 0.8386
Deep pressure 0.7270
Fullness/distention 0.5493
Dull pain 0.6732
Heaviness 0.7301
Numbness 0.7296
Warmth 0.5565
Throbbing 0.5688
Soreness 0.5784
Cold 0.7008
Eigen value 2.11013 1.98541 1.29681 1.08159

Table 5.

Presence of Acupuncture Sensation by Factors C(E)

GV20 ST25 BL24 LU9 GB40 Total p-value
Factor 1 39(39.2) 32(39.2) 28(39.2) 51(39.2) 41(39.2) 191** 0.000
Factor 2 27(37) 46(37) 49(37) 27(37) 36(37) 185** 0.000
Factor 3 15(12.4) 13(12.4) 7(12.4) 19(12.4) 8(12.4) 62* 0.041
Factor 4 6(7.8) 8(7.8) 5(7.8) 10(7.8) 10(7.8) 39 0.555

Factor 1 : aching, tingling, sharp pain

Factor 2 : deep pressure, fullness/ distention, dull pain, heaviness

Factor 3 : numbness, warmth, throbbing

Factor 4 : soreness, cold

C : count. E : expected.

*:

significant at p<0.05.

** :

significant at p<0.01